Movie Review: Ghostbusters

by KALEY MCLAIN

Staff Writer

 

When there’s something strange in the neighborhood, who are you going to call? Ghostbusters!

Everybody knows the song, we’ve heard it over and over again. It has been plastered to our brains even from the year 1984. But, over the years, I’ve realized that very few in this generation have actually watched this classic film.

The plot summary is simple: a group of psychologists band together in search and seizure from the cries of helpless patients involved in paranormal activities. Calling to each help like firemen do, the team goes in search for many in a day. They could be found in most many places, and normally only cause a big disturbance or hauntingly scary punks. Whatever the case, this strong cast of characters calmly resolve the problem as if seeing ghost come into habit on a normal basis. Bill Murray, some would say the leader of the pack, really does make this movie. Presumably a horror at first glance, this flick is easily transformed into a hilarious comedy. Straight from the 80’s, Murray’s key role as comedic relief and sarcastic insight cause for a familiar and highly intriguing watch.

The famed Sigourney Weaver also makes her way onto the film as the main love interest to Murray. And odd, yet highly illusive relationship between the two capture an essence of a dramatic and adaptive way of movie making. Now I’m not saying this movie is high in the filmmaking charts. That would be a lie. It is not profoundly notable by strong filming techniques or praised for best ensemble, it is simply a classical family together-in-the-living-room pleasant watch.

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