Movie Review: Birdman

by KALEY MCLAIN

Staff Writer

Birdman Kaley

This movie was, for lack of a better term, captivating.

It follows the fading life of an actor who once had played a famed superhero (Birdman) as he washes away his career in the depths of a sad attempt in a Broadway show revamp. This movie line is starkly ironic, in partnership with the main focus Michael Keaton, due to its parallel turn of events that follows the realistic life of Keaton himself. Humorously jarring, Birdman is a close resemblance to that of Batman wouldn’t you say? It’s no secret this picture was a personal look into the declining stardom of its protagonist in the actual world, but what is most remarkable about this movie: its distinguished filming style.

Now anyone who was able to watch this masterpiece would notice it’s prolonged and untainted footage. Its as if you are immersed in the film itself, never truly hearing the director’s cue to “Cut!”. That’s what allows the actors to be so brilliant. From watching behind the scenes footage, the crew explained how each scene shot took as long as twenty minutes, as if the audience were enjoying a live show that they were able to physically walk through. One small hiccup in this endless rolling tape could consequently ruin that last thirty minutes of the movie. It is decided as a completely new and inventive way of movie adaptation. Not to mention the constant banter of an uplifting and highly intoxicating murmur of a drum artist to swallow the emotions of the characters and spit them into song. It’s as if they brought the hipster house coffee shop to a big screen and paired it with the grueling storyline of a liquidated actor.

I will repeat again, the strong ensemble of acting really pushed this movie to its limits. Innovated and tangible actors like Emma Stone, Zach Galifianakis, and the prolific Edward Norton made me believe that Birdman was, in itself, of monumental value. I must admit this movie is not for the likes of everyone, you simply like/appreciate it, or you call it trash. From my eyes, this film is a hidden treasure that allows the viewer to come up with a contemporary outlook on life. It’s a step in the right direction of filmmaking, and a definite leap into my highly praised movie collection.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s